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the musings of a social work grad student~
Posted on 15th Sep at 6:43 PM, with 543 notes
"Cross-racial struggle made clear the work that white women needed to do in order for cross-racial sisterhood to really be powerful. Among the directives were the following: Don’t expect women of color to be your educators, to do all the bridge work. White women need to be the bridge - a lot of the time. Do not lump African American, Latina, Asian American, and Native American women into one category. History, culture, imperialism, language, class, region, and sexuality make the concept of a monolithic “women of color” indefensible. Listen to women of color’s anger. It is informed by centuries of struggle, erasure, and experience. White women, look to your own history for signs of heresy and rebellion. Do not take the histories of Black, Latina, or Native American women as your own. They are not and never were yours."
Becky Thompson, “Multiracial Feminism: Recasting the Chronology of Second Wave Feminism,” in Nancy Hewitt, ed., No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminisms (via ohgeeznora)
Posted on 15th Sep at 5:16 PM, with 1,375 notes

randomlancila:

Stereotyping does not occur in a vacuum. It’s the first step on a really dark path. Words mean things. Assumptions mean things. Be aware of this.

Posted on 8th Sep at 11:29 AM, with 88 notes
"

Trauma inevitably brings loss. Even those who are lucky enough to escape physically unscathed still lose the internal psychological structures of a self securely attached to others. Those who are physically harmed lose in addition their sense of bodily integrity. And those who lose important people in their lives face a new void in their relationships with friends, family, or community. Traumatic losses rupture the ordinary sequence of generations and defy the ordinary social conventions of bereavement. The telling of the trauma story thus inevitably plunges the survivor into the profound grief. Since so many of the losses are invisible or unrecognized, the customary rituals of mourning provide little consolation.

The descent into mourning is at once the most necessary and the most dreaded task of this stage of recovery. Patients often fear that the task is insurmountable, that once they allow themselves to start grieving they will never stop. Danieli quotes a 74-year-old widow who survived the Nazi Holocaust: “Even if it takes one year to mourn each loss, and even if I live to be 107 [and mourn all members of my family], what do I do about the rest of the six million?”

The survivor frequently resists mourning, not only out of fear but also out of pride. She may consciously refuse to grieve as a way of denying victory to the perpetrator….Reclaiming the ability to feel the full range of emotions, including grief, must be understood as an act of resistance rather than submission to the perpetrator’s intent. Only through mourning everything that she has lost can the patient discover her indestructible inner life….

…Resistance to mourning can take on numerous disguises. Most frequently it appears as a fantasy of magical resolution through revenge, forgiveness, or compensation.

The revenge fantasy is often a mirror image of the traumatic memory, in which the roles of perpetrator and victim are reversed. It often has the same grotesque, frozen, and wordless quality as the traumatic memory itself. The revenge fantasy is one form of the wish for catharsis. The victim imagines that she can get rid of the terror, shame, and pain of the trauma by retaliating against the perpetrator. The desire for revenge also arises out of the experience of complete helplessness. In her humiliated fury, the victim imagines that revenge is the only way to restore her own sense of power. She may also imagine that this is the only way to force the perpetrator to acknowledge the harm he has done to her.

Though the traumatized person imagines that revenge will bring relief, repetitive revenge fantasies actually increase her torment….During the process of mourning, the survivor must come to terms with the impossibility of getting even. As she vents her rage in safety, her helpless fury gradually changes into a more powerful and satisfying form of anger: righteous indignation. …Giving up the fantasy of revenge does not mean giving up the quest for justice; on the contrary, it begins the process of joining with others to hold the perpetrator accountable for his crimes.

Revolted by the fantasy of revenge, some survivors attempt to bypass their outrage altogether through a fantasy of forgiveness. This fantasy, like its polar opposite, is an attempt at empowerment. The survivor imagines that she can transcend her rage and erase the impact of the trauma through a willed, defiant act of love. But it is not possible to exorcise the trauma, through either hatred or love. Like revenge, the fantasy of forgiveness often becomes a cruel torture…true forgiveness cannot be granted until the perpetrator has sought and earned it through confession, repentance, and restitution.

Genuine contrition in a perpetrator is a rare miracle. Fortunately, the survivor does not need to wait for it. Her healing depends on the discovery of restorative love in her own life; it does not require the love be extended to the perpetrator. Once the survivor has mourned the traumatic event, she may be surprised to discover how uninteresting the perpetrator has become to her and how little concern she feels for his fate. She may even feel sorrow and compassion for him, but this disengaged feeling is not the same as forgiveness.

"
Judith Herman, Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence - from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror (via seebster)
Posted on 30th Aug at 10:34 AM, with 13,589 notes
"Collective movements for social justice do not gain traction through niceness. American women did not gain the right to vote by skipping down Pennsylvania Avenue while whistling cute songs about suffrage: they picketed, they marched, they yelled, they were arrested. Abusive partners and rapists will not be stopped by women having heart-to-hearts with their violators over coffee, because ghosts cannot talk and broken fingers cannot lift a latte. The patriarchy cannot be shattered by good vibes. In order to bring about change, old and oppressive structures must be destroyed. Destruction is not negative if what will grow from the rubble is something that will create a safer, healthier, stronger society."

Feminism is Not “The F Word” — Seventh Grove

Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer said she doesn’t identify as a feminist because feminism is “too negative.” Here’s what I have to say about that…

(via forevercemetery)

broken fingers cannot lift a latte is going to stick with me.

(via flatbear)

Tagged: #feminism,
Posted on 30th Aug at 10:29 AM, with 5,400 notes
"A quarter of high schools with the highest percentage of black and Latino students do not offer Algebra II; a third of these schools do not offer chemistry. Fewer than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students have access to the full range of math and science courses in their high school"
Posted on 24th Aug at 11:01 PM, with 8,351 notes
"

When a white teenager named Steve Lohner was stopped by the police last month and refused to show his ID after carrying a loaded shotgun on the streets of Aurora, Colorado (the same city where a mass murderer killed 12 people and injured 70 others in a packed movie theater in July 2012), the teen walked away with nothing but a citation.

But when a 22-year-old black kid named John Crawford picked up a mere BB gun in a Walmart store in Dayton, Ohio last week, customers called the police, who then shot and killed him.

Here lies a racial disparity that’s difficult for honest people to ignore. How can black people openly carry a real gun when we can’t even pick up a BB gun in a store without arousing suspicion? The answer in America is that the Second Amendment doesn’t really apply to black people.

"
Posted on 21st Aug at 8:49 PM, with 1,849 notes
mapsontheweb:

Countries with Universal Health Care
The U.S. stands almost entirely alone among developed nations that lack universal health care.

healthcare is a human right.
View high resolution

mapsontheweb:

Countries with Universal Health Care

The U.S. stands almost entirely alone among developed nations that lack universal health care.

healthcare is a human right.

Posted on 28th Jul at 11:44 PM, with 1,065 notes
america-wakiewakie:

Mass Incarceration: 21 Amazing Facts About America’s Obsession With Prison | Activist Post
#1 There are more than 2.4 million people behind bars in America as you read this article.#2 Since 1980, the number of people incarcerated in U.S. prisons has quadrupled.#3 The incarceration rate in the United States is more than 4 times higher than the incarceration rate in the UK and more than 6 times higher than the incarceration rate in Canada.#4 Approximately 12 million people cycle through local jails in the U.S. each and every year.#5 Overall, the United States has the largest prison population and the highest incarceration rate in the entire world.#6 Approximately one out of every four prisoners on the entire planet are in U.S. prisons, but the United States only accounts for about five percent of the total global population.#7 The state of Maryland (total population 5.9 million) has more people in prison than Iraq (total population 31.9 million).#8 The state of Ohio (total population 11.6 million) has more people in prison than Pakistan (total population 192.1 million).#9 Incredibly, 41 percent of all young people in America have been arrested by the time they turn 23.#10 Between 1990 and 2009 the number of Americans in private prisons increased by about 1600 percent.#11 At this point, private prison companies operate more than 50 percent of all “youth correctional facilities” in this nation.#12 There are more African-Americans under “correctional supervision” right now than were in slavery in the United States in 1850.#13 Approximately 90 percent of those being held in prisons in the United States are men.#14 The incarceration rate for African-American men is more than 6 times higher than it is for white men.#15 An astounding 37.2 percent of African-American men from age 20 to age 34 with less than a high school education were incarcerated in 2008.#16 Police in New York City conducted nearly 700,000 “stop-and-frisk searches” in 2011 alone.#17 The “SWATification” of America has gotten completely and totally out of control.  Back in 1980, there were only about 3,000 SWAT raids in the United States for the entire year.  Today, there aremore than 80,000 SWAT raids in the United States every single year.#18 Illegal immigrants make up approximately 30 percent of the total population in our federal, state and local prisons.#19 The average “minimum security” inmate in federal prison costs U.S. taxpayers $21,000 a year.#20 The average “maximum security” inmate in federal prison costs U.S. taxpayers $33,000 a year.#21 Overall, it costs more than 60 billion dollars a year to keep all of these people locked up.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: OK Observer)
View high resolution

america-wakiewakie:

Mass Incarceration: 21 Amazing Facts About America’s Obsession With Prison | Activist Post

#1 There are more than 2.4 million people behind bars in America as you read this article.

#2 Since 1980, the number of people incarcerated in U.S. prisons has quadrupled.

#3 The incarceration rate in the United States is more than 4 times higher than the incarceration rate in the UK and more than 6 times higher than the incarceration rate in Canada.

#4 Approximately 12 million people cycle through local jails in the U.S. each and every year.

#5 Overall, the United States has the largest prison population and the highest incarceration rate in the entire world.

#6 Approximately one out of every four prisoners on the entire planet are in U.S. prisons, but the United States only accounts for about five percent of the total global population.

#7 The state of Maryland (total population 5.9 million) has more people in prison than Iraq (total population 31.9 million).

#8 The state of Ohio (total population 11.6 million) has more people in prison than Pakistan (total population 192.1 million).

#9 Incredibly, 41 percent of all young people in America have been arrested by the time they turn 23.

#10 Between 1990 and 2009 the number of Americans in private prisons increased by about 1600 percent.

#11 At this point, private prison companies operate more than 50 percent of all “youth correctional facilities” in this nation.

#12 There are more African-Americans under “correctional supervision” right now than were in slavery in the United States in 1850.

#13 Approximately 90 percent of those being held in prisons in the United States are men.

#14 The incarceration rate for African-American men is more than 6 times higher than it is for white men.

#15 An astounding 37.2 percent of African-American men from age 20 to age 34 with less than a high school education were incarcerated in 2008.

#16 Police in New York City conducted nearly 700,000 “stop-and-frisk searches” in 2011 alone.

#17 The “SWATification” of America has gotten completely and totally out of control.  Back in 1980, there were only about 3,000 SWAT raids in the United States for the entire year.  Today, there aremore than 80,000 SWAT raids in the United States every single year.

#18 Illegal immigrants make up approximately 30 percent of the total population in our federal, state and local prisons.

#19 The average “minimum security” inmate in federal prison costs U.S. taxpayers $21,000 a year.

#20 The average “maximum security” inmate in federal prison costs U.S. taxpayers $33,000 a year.

#21 Overall, it costs more than 60 billion dollars a year to keep all of these people locked up.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: OK Observer)

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