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the musings of a social work grad student~
Posted on 22nd Jul at 10:03 PM, with 1,822 notes
"

In the late 1970s, crack first came on the scene in the form of cocaine freebasing. Many of its users were stockbrokers and investment bankers, rock stars, Hollywood types, and a few pro athletes. Some of them began to get in trouble with this form of cocaine use, showing up in hospital emergency rooms and police stations. Congress passed new laws to extend health insurance coverage to include drug treatment. The treatment industry expanded the number of beds available.

In the mid 1980s, crack use spread into America’s inner cities among impoverished African Americans and Latinos. Some of them began to get in trouble with this form of cocaine use, showing up in hospital emergency rooms and police stations. Congress passed new laws to extend the length of criminal sentences for crack offenses. The prison industry expanded the number of beds available.

"
Reinarman & Levine, 2004, as cited in Rosenblum & Travis, 2012 (via mycitynotforsaken)
Posted on 16th Jul at 8:03 AM, with 83,384 notes
"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything."

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

THAT’S THE PRICE YOU PAY FOR OWNING EVERYTHING

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

Posted on 4th Jul at 1:07 PM, with 1,188 notes
"In a capitalist society, it should not be surprising that we tend to measure health in terms of productivity. Self-care and workaholism are two sides of the same coin: preserve yourself so you can produce more. This would explain why self-care rhetoric is so prevalent in the non-profit sector, where the pressure to compete for funding often compels organizers to mimic corporate behavior, even if they use different terminology."
Posted on 4th Jul at 1:04 PM, with 46 notes
"The Declaration of Independence implicitly legalized the enslavement of Black people and the genocide of Native people within the context of the developing American capitalist nation-state."
Frederick Douglass

I hope people use their time off today for contemplation on what American Independence really means and at who’s expense it came.
Posted on 1st Jul at 10:23 PM, with 11,671 notes
"What many people do not know is that the use of standardized tests has its origins in the Eugenics movement, where basic tenets assert that certain races are inferior to others biologically and intellectually."

Karen Lewis, President of the Chicago Teachers Union

Standardized testing and the Eugenics movement »

A MUST read by Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis. Standardized testing isn’t about improving education, it’s a way for the system to sort out which kids are meant to succeed and which are destined failure.

(via socialismartnature)

Posted on 30th Jun at 7:18 PM, with 157,951 notes
professorfangirl:

lupusdraconis:

usagimaree:

gobeautiful:

thelatestkate:

my therapist taught me to start thinking of my anxiety as my panicky friend
it’s working???

this is so cute omg

Woah this is super useful!!

For all my anxious friends out there.

This totally works! Some of us get stuck in the sense that we *are* our emotions, so they overwhelm us and we can’t do anything about them. When you give your emotion an identity separate from you, it gives you the distance to make better judgments about it, and to comfort yourself better. 10/10 therapy veterans would recommend.
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professorfangirl:

lupusdraconis:

usagimaree:

gobeautiful:

thelatestkate:

my therapist taught me to start thinking of my anxiety as my panicky friend

it’s working???

this is so cute omg

Woah this is super useful!!

For all my anxious friends out there.

This totally works! Some of us get stuck in the sense that we *are* our emotions, so they overwhelm us and we can’t do anything about them. When you give your emotion an identity separate from you, it gives you the distance to make better judgments about it, and to comfort yourself better. 10/10 therapy veterans would recommend.

Posted on 3rd Jun at 11:46 AM, with 4 notes
Neurobiology, Symbolic Imagery & Jung — And A Book That Brings Them Together

socialjusticesolutions:

The Neurobiology of the Gods (2012) first gained accolades for grounding CG Jung’s ideas in modern neuroscience. Yet Goodwyn’s explanation for why we create symbolic imagery makes this an important book not only for analytical psychologists, but also for evolutionary psychologists, traumatologists, and anyone interested in the central role of symbolic imagery for human experience.

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL ARTICLE

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